The Australian Outback is well known throughout the world for its wide open spaces of barren bushland, red earth, rocks and dry trees!  This is where the majority of Australia’s Aboriginal population live, where you will find spread out sheep stations, road trains rolling by and well known Australian wildlife.  Kangaroos, dingos, emus and even camels call the Australian outback their home!

We returned with some amazing images after recently having taken a road-trip into the Outback, enough for an The Australian Outback Photo Essay.

 

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One of the most famous Australian landmarks, people worldwide identify Uluru with the Australian Outback. Ayers Rock, as it is also commonly called, is the sacred mountain of the Aboriginals who have decorated it with paintings and engravings.

 

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While on the subject of Uluru, you can choose to climb the 1,142 high rock! This is a view from the top! That being said the Aboriginals prefer visitors not to climb due to the religious significance of the rock.

 

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Aboriginal culture is celebrated in Australia, and traditional Aboriginal art such as dot painting can be found throughout the Outback.

 

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Covered with traditional Aboriginal dot painting, a rustic old piano sits outside one of the outback resorts.

 

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Serpentine Gorge is a stunning natural feature of the Australian Outback. Just one of the gorges in the West McDonnell Ranges in the Northern Territory, this gorge forms part of the Larapinta Hiking Trail. We attempted the trail during our time in the Outback, however 223 km (or 139 miles) through some of Australia’s harshest environment meant we only made it halfway.

 

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Views of the West McDonnell Ranges. We were still hiking the Larapinta Trail at this point.

 

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Views of the West McDonnell Ranges. We were still hiking the Larapinta Trail at this point.

 

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If you break down in the Outback plan on walking for a while!

 

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Kangaroos are one of the biggest road hazards in Australia! They are incredibly strong animals and will do more damage to your car than you will do to them!

 

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A Kangaroo painted onto a tin shed at a sheep station in Central Australia. The Kangaroo is an unofficial symbol of Australia. It appears on the Australian emblem, on our currency, and the image of a Kangaroo is used by some of Australia’s most well known companies like Qantas and the Royal Australian Air Force.

 

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Kelpies are Australian sheep dogs trained at mustering and droving. They drive mobs of livestock long distances in all climates and conditions.

 

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This warning was found on the inside door of a bathroom at a sheep station in Central Australia!

 

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The Dingo is one of Australia’s most famous predators and is viewed by many to be a cultural icon. While travelling through the outback it’s extremely important to keep all of your belongings, especially your food, locked safely away in a car, hotel room or tent. We left an eski (cooler) full of our food for the week outside our tent for 20 minutes and came back to find it had all been devoured!

 

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During the 19th century thousands of Camels were imported to Australia from India as a form of transportation! Few Camels remain wild in the Australian Outback today, however those who do are referred to as “Australian feral camels”. Currently it is estimated that the camel population is around 1 million, however they are being culled as they degrade the environment and are threatening native Australian species.

 

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Another stunning Australian landmark located quite close to Uluru is Kata Tjuta, more commonly referred to as the Olgas. They are a large group of domed rock formations and absolutely stunning to view at sun set!

 

Megan is an Australian Journalist who has been traveling and blogging around the world for the last 7 years to inspire others to embark on their own worldwide adventure! Her husband Mike is an American travel photographer, and together they have made the world their home. Meg has recently launched “Mapping Megan”, an up and coming travel blog which aims to give you the best tips and advice on traveling, volunteering, living, working and holidaying abroad. She hasn’t been everywhere, but it’s on her list!You can also follow her journey on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest

 

Have you been to Australia?  What did you think?